What is A.A.?

Alcoholics Anonymous is a fellowship of people who come together to solve their drinking problem. It doesn’t cost anything to attend A.A. meetings. There are no age or education requirements to participate. Membership is open to anyone who wants to do something about their drinking problem.

A.A.’s primary purpose is to help alcoholics to achieve sobriety.

https://www.aa.org/

How A.A Works

A.A.’s Twelve Steps are a set of spiritual principles. When practiced as a way of life, they can expel the obsession to drink and enable the sufferer to recover from alcoholism.

The Twelve Traditions apply to A.A. as a whole. They outline how A.A. maintains its unity and relates itself to the world around it.

The book Alcoholics Anonymous describes the A.A. program of recovery. It also contains stories written by the co-founders and stories from a wide range of members who have found recovery in A.A.

https://www.aa.org/

Literature is available and for sale at most local groups and Central office

AA Meetings, What to expect

Attending an AA meeting is simple. Find a meeting that is convenient for you and just go. That’s it!

There is no signing in, no cost, no appointment, no intrusive questions, no obligations. Your privacy and anonymity will be respected. You’ll never be met with a demand to come back to any meeting or indeed to AA.

Many of us had no idea what to expect of our first meeting. For some of us the idea was quite scary. We were greatly relieved to find that our fears were groundless.

Ready for your first meeting?

Anyone with a desire to stop drinking is welcome, regardless of race, gender, sexual orientation, religion, income or profession. And it’s free.

You can just sit and listen and learn more about recovery, or you can share about your situation. It’s completely up to you.

If you are a local resident of Nanaimo or the surrounding area, connect with our office and we will help you with finding a meeting. We can also also answer any questions you may have and find support for your first meeting.

https://www.aa.org/

New to A.A Pamphlets

This is A.A. - An introduction to the A.A. Recovery Program

p-1 This Is A.A. -
An introduction to the A.A. recovery program

An introduction to A.A.: describes who A.A.s are and what they have learned about alcoholism. For all who think they may have a drinking problem.

P-2 Frequently Asked Questions

P-2 Frequently Asked Questions About A.A.

Answers many of the common questions people have about alcoholism and A.A.: What is alcoholism? What are the Twelve Steps? How can I tell if I am really an alcoholic?

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P-3 Is A.A. for You?

Lists 12 questions to ask yourself if you think you may be an alcoholic. For those who think they may have a drinking problem.

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F-9 A Message to Teenagers...

Adapted from the pamphlet “Too Young?”, this flyer was created for public information purposes in schools.

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P-24 A Newcomer Asks

Straightforward answers to 15 questions that those new to Alcoholics Anonymous frequently ask about getting sober in A.A.

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P-30 Is There an Alcoholic in Your Life?

Directed to family and friends of the problem drinker, this pamphlet describes what active alcoholism looks like and explains how A.A. may be able to help a loved one stop drinking.

P-35_ProOtherThanAlcohol

P-35 Problems Other Than Alcohol

Bill W.'s thoughts on the status of those addicted to drugs and other substances within A.A. are as timely as when they appeared in a 1958 Grapevine.

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P-86 The "God" Word: Agnostic and Atheist Members in A.A.

Ten agnostic/atheist members share their experience of finding meaningful recovery in A.A., showing there is room in the Fellowship for believers and non-believers alike.

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F-2 Information on Alcoholics Anonymous

This flyer presents basic information on Alcoholics Anonymous both for those who think they may have a drinking problem and for those who come in contact with them.